How could nourishing African art spheres work? Call for Submissions

Enkare Review

As a small, largely informal, artist collective, it would be easy to say we’re too busy working, too busy creating, too busy staying afloat to engage in a deliberate or consistent manner with any Big Issues™ that are not Art as such. We could say that, in fact, it really isn’t our place. We could suggest that we should act ‘neutral’, and stay silent. That would not only be foolish, it would also be false. It would be untrue to our proper work as artists, curators, and citizens. In various ways, we participate individually in large and small battles against these Big Issues. However, we are still working out how that fight and commitment is best translated in our work as a collective.

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Brief Notes on Poems, Anti-poems, Sub-poems and Poem-like Things

for Enkare Review’s Poetry Squad

As Enkare Review, we have been working through some growing pains, and it is a mark of pride that we have still prioritized working closely with the artists we feature whenever possible. One challenge we are looking to overcome is that we haven’t made as much work as a collective. We are already changing this (look out for more work from us!). Another is that we haven’t provided enough feedback to the entries we do not proceed with. The submissions are, thankfully, very many, and we are a small (unpaid) family. That said, we are grateful for all the kind and overworked* editors who have provided us (sometimes detailed) notes over the years, and as our team grows, we hope to evolve into those rare breeds.

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Introduction to Issue II

Enkare Review


In her introduction to the first issue of A Public Space, Brigid Hughes expresses the hope that, “the magazine will be an ongoing conversation between writers, editors, and readers.” A magazine is not simply a collection of words whipped together and presented to its publics. Rather, a magazine is a living thing: a dialogue, a dance, a game, an experience shared between its conveyors and its receivers. And it is with this in mind that we present our second issue to you, our community of readers and supporters. We ask that you think of it as more than a mix of the words and thoughts and creative products of the few writers and poets and editors and artists featured here, but as the product of an ongoing engagement between all of us—  readers and editors and writers and poets and artists—  who make up Enkare Review.

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A Sense of Where We Are, an introduction

Enkare Review

A Sense of Where We Are’ is a series of brief notes and reflections from people in and close to the Enkare family about the 2017 elections in Kenya. When reading these notes, we ask you for two things: i) attention and ii) expansiveness. If prayer is ‘unmixed attention,’ then pray about what it means to be Kenyan today; pray about the lives that have been stolen; pray about the dreams have been deferred to build this nation, and the spirit in which it was done; pray about the promises made to our grandparents; and pray about the hopes, shared and private, that we hold in our hearts. Pay attention. This is our true and proper work. Come to these reflections with large-heartedness, with a willingness to stretch for your fellow humans, with trust that all life is worth preserving, and that the work required to do so is also worth the investment.

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An Introduction to Issue I

Enkare Review

In July 2016, a bunch of twenty-something-year-olds sat down in a cafe on Koinange Lane in Nairobi and decided to set up a literary magazine. They had no idea of the amount of time, energy and dedication it takes to run a literary magazine. All they knew is that they wanted to create a space that would allow both emerging and established writers to converge and have narratives that converse with one another.

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